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Does TLC = Sideshow?

In the coming weeks this blog will be host to a new series about popular culture, in particular the programming on TLC, and how it portrays “abnormal” people, families, and cultural groups.

As I’ve pointed out before, the History Channel seems to cater more to aliens, UFOs, truckers, and loggers than to actual historical programming.  Similarly, The Learning Channel has moved away from historical, scientific, or cultural documentaries to reality programming that focuses on people that are “different”.

Abby and Tori

My guests for these posts are Abigail Gautreau and Tori Warenik.  Abby is a PhD student in Public History at Middle Tennessee State University, and Tori is working on her Master of Arts degree in English, also at MTSU.

A BuzzFeed post has recently been popular on social media tracking the “Historyof TLC”.  The change from educational programming to more popular topics began in the 1990s with shows like Trading Spaces and A Wedding Story and A Baby Story.  This has only shifted further from typical educational programming in the recent years.

Abby and Brittany Hensel

A great article about the shift from educational programs to reality television was written by Robert P. Laurence in 2005 titled, “Channels built on arts, education and high culture now go low with cheesy programming.” This article tackles reasons why this shift has occurred, and it includes the quote, “High culture has never had much of a place on American television,” by Tim Brooks, Lifetime’s vice president for research and co-author (with Earle Marsh) of “The Complete Directory to Prime Time Network and Cable TV Shows.”  Luckily, the article also points out that PBS will likely never go the reality TV route that other educational channels have gone.

Some of my fellow graduate students and I have long gathered in the evenings to watch such programs as Sister Wives, Here Comes Honey Boo Boo, Big Fat Gypsy Wedding, Abby and Brittany, and Toddlers and Tiaras.  While watching these, as academics are prone to do, we started discussing the social aspects of these shows and the fact that they seem to be highlighting the strange to gain more viewers, much like the carnivals and sideshows of the past.

Big Fat Gypsy Wedding

Over the next several weeks, we will post our thoughts on Kody Brown and his four lovely wives and several children on Sister Wives, the insanely large Duggar Family on 19 Kids and Countingthe cultural group that is often segregated and discriminated against on My Big Fat Gypsy Wedding, the interesting depiction of a “different” socio-economic family on Here Comes Honey Boo Boo, Abby and Brittany Hensel’s intriguing life as conjoined twins (so many questions!), and the lives of NICU Pediatrician Jen Arnold and her husband Bill Klein on The Little Couple  At some point in the future we also hope to tackle My Strange Obsession and Stanley Thornton, Jr. who lives his life as an Adult Baby on various shows across networks.

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